NEUTERING

Canine bitch spays

Pros …

  • No unwanted attention from roving male dogs – so no accidental pregnancies.
  • Prevents pyometra – a serious, potentially life-threatening infection of the uterus that can affect your female dog when she gets older.
  • Prevents ovarian and canine uterine cancer.
  • Reduces the risk of canine mammary cancer the earlier in life you have her spayed.
  • We can use laparoscopic bitch spay (dog neutering) techniques – keyhole-assisted surgery – that lessens the impact of the procedure.

Cons

  • It is major surgery and comes with the usual risks associated with general anaesthesia.
  • Potential urinary incontinence later in life – but this is actually pretty uncommon and can be controlled by drugs.
  • Some claim weight gain as a side-effect but as ever, you can control this for your pet with good diet and exercise.

Top Tips

  • Most bitches will have their first season between six and 12 months.
  • We don’t spay (dog neutering) bitches just before or just after the first season as increased blood supply to the uterus and ovaries increases surgical risk and for up to three months after the season ends, your pet may naturally develop a false pregnancy due to hormone imbalance.
  • False pregnancy symptoms include: lactation, low appetite, general agitation or ‘nesting’ behaviour like carrying toys to bed.
  • Best time to spay your bitch? Best practice says either at six months (subject to a thorough examination to check she’s mature enough) or preferably around three to four months after that first season – or after any post-season false pregnancy has passed.

Need advice on bitch spays? Call us on 01530 836654 at our Coalville animal surgery during opening hours. We’ll be pleased to help.

Canine dog castration

As with spaying bitches, surgical canine castration – removal of the testicles – under general anaesthetic is routine, but it’s a significant procedure and not without the attendant risks of complication. Unless you intend to put your chap out to stud, it’s important to balance the relative advantages and disadvantages.

Pros …

  • Neither unwanted pregnancies nor accidental litters with another owner’s female.
  • May help if you’re enduring behavioural issues such as aggression, roaming or inappropriate scent marking.
  • Prevents canine testicular cancer later in life plus reduces the chances of prostatic hyperplasia – an enlarged prostate – as well as canine prostate cancer.
  • His bark will not turn soprano!

Cons

  • It’s major surgery and comes with the usual risks associated with general anaesthesia.
  • It can make him more docile and may sometimes change the consistency of his coat.
  • Again, some claim weight gain as a side-effect but as ever, you can control this for him with good diet and exercise.

Top Tips

  • Best time to castrate your dog? He’ll start maturing reproductively from around six months. Best practice says castrate from that point onwards (subject to a thorough examination to check he’s mature enough).
  • If you are experiencing behavioural problems with your un-neutered K-9 youngster, come and talk to us at the earliest opportunity.

Need advice on dog castration? Call us on 01530 836654 at our Coalville animal surgery during opening hours. We’ll be pleased to help.